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18 October 2010

Get Fighting Fit Running Program (UPDATED 2017)

TRAIN HARD FIGHT EASY !

Running is one most neglected of all training routines but can be one of the most effective.

Since the 1970's when the fitness boom began, running has become a premier activity for aspiring fighters everywhere though it's easy to get confused as to how it should fit in to your routine. 

Below is a basic guide to combat that issue without over training and subtracting all your hard work. This article is aimed at beginners who wish to incorporate running as part of their Martial Arts Fitness routine or those that just want to improve their overall fitness levels in general so is aimed towards the beginner to intermediate level. 


Running:

Running is a straight forward aerobic exercise and is normally the back bone of all sports that require a high level of cardiovascular fitness strength to stay in the top flight. As you pound along you raise your heart rate, increase your oxygen intake and heighten the flow of blood to the parts of your body being used. As you increase your heart rate using the energy stored in your body it draws upon your reserves of fat which is why you lose weight!! You should be running hard enough to to get your heart rate into the aerobic training range (between 65% and 75% of your maximum) for at least 20 mins at least three times a week.


Posture:

Your posture should be upright but relaxed, perhaps leaning forward slightly because if you lean to far back this will have a braking effect on your movements.


Arm action:

Arm action is nearly as important as how you use your legs. When you run your arms should stay relaxed and they should stay between your waist line and chest.  Do not let them swing to loosely or you will lose forward momentum. The same thing will happen if your arms are to rigid.


Footstrike:

The Most comfortable and efficient footstike for the average runner is 'heel-ball'. This means your foot hits the ground with the outside edge of your heel, pivot through your foot and take off from the ball of your foot. Slapping along on your feet will cause you injuries especially in the knees.


The short fast run:

A maximum of two per week for at least 20-25 minutes.The pace should be fast at about 6 minutes per mile and if you train with a partner you shouldn't be able to talk to him or her. Don't get up to full pace for 5 or 6 minutes first or you could go into oxygen dept and 'tie up'. Once you have your pace time your run from there. So 5 or 6 minutes to warm up then 20-25 minutes of fast running.


The basic run:

A standard run should last up to 45 minutes at a comfortable pace. You should be able to talk with your training partner at this pace though don't expect to hold  a symposium on Aristotelian metaphysics! Average a pace of 7 minutes per mile and adjust accordingly to take on a few gentle hills.


The endurance builder:

This is 90 minutes of slow gentle jogging at a pace where you can hold a comfortable conversation with your training partner. You might want to include this once a fortnight to your routine and maybe to once a week as you get fitter. Although it's slow you will certainly feel it afterwards.


Distance:

Don't get hung up on distance. Run for time because as the weeks go on and you get fitter you will be covering more distance in the same amount of time. If you run 3 miles in 25 minutes as the weeks go on your time will better itself and you could find yourself completing that distance in 21 minutes thus, knocking off 4 minutes quality training time from your routine!! So you have to adjust accordingly